James’s Sound Engineering Blog

When not running sessions at Third Circle Recordings, Sound Engineer in chief James Gasson likes to take an objective look at various recording principles, techniques and practices. He celebrates his findings by prodding words into a keyboard and then publishing them on his blog “Confessions of a Sound Engineer“, however you can view James’s latest experiments with coherency right here.

MOTU??! Urrgh… *Real* Sound Engineers Only Use Prism Converters, Dontcha Know? Hiffle, piffle, plip and wank.

December 22nd, 2017|

Earlier this year I visited Steve Albini’s Chicago studio, Electrical Audio, with the goal of not only recording some drums with the man himself, but also scrutinising his mic techniques in order to learn more [...]

Crushed To Hell: My Thoughts About Mastering

February 23rd, 2017|

For the second time in my life I have realised that reaching out to a mastering studio to put the “finishing touches” on my music is completely pointless. Allow me to explain… Mastering recorded audio [...]

The Bullshittery Of Audio Jargon

September 17th, 2015|

The topic of audio recording is vast and open-ended, and discussion about associated equipment in particular often gives rise to much heated debate with respect to perceived differences in the sonic performance between devices. It [...]

Stereo Recording Techniques On Test

March 28th, 2015|

Often in recording scenarios it is necessary to implement a stereo miking technique. Usually this is employed to capture room ambience at a distance from the originating sound source, by which I mean the reverberant [...]

Comb Filtering In Drum Overhead Microphones

March 22nd, 2015|

Recording drums in a small room is a problem that any engineer not blessed with an infinite budget must deal with at some point. Among the difficulties inherent in this scenario is the problem of [...]

Impulse Responses & Convolution Reverb: How To Sample An Acoustic Space

January 16th, 2015|

Those familiar with audio production probably know that there are two types of digitally synthesised reverb effect. The first, and generally most popular given its byte-sized (heh) use of computer resources is known as “algorithmic” [...]

Binaural Recording

November 15th, 2014|

Have you ever wondered how it is possible for the human brain to so accurately detect the location of a perceived sound? We only have two ears, yet somehow we are able to discern the [...]

Eliminating High-Hat Spill

September 24th, 2014|

When recording a drum kit one of the most perennial problems encountered is high-hat spill on the snare microphone. Some engineers claim to have made peace with this issue by utilising the signal as simply [...]

Thread Adapters And The Pain Of Existence

June 26th, 2014|

My sound engineering brethren, I feel your pain. I do. And for years I have been struggling just as you have, coerced into climbing that familiar mountain, bravely embarking 'cross the bridge of despair, a [...]

Mics Or Mikes?

May 18th, 2014|

Studio engineers, recording enthusiasts, musicians and journalists. I hereby call your attention to an issue of utmost importance. It is something that has niggled for as long as I have been writing about studio recording [...]

Honesty

July 23rd, 2012|

There is a fundamental and perpetually overlooked tactic worth employing in the game of social interaction that we find ourselves playing every day, which preserves dignity and integrity and renders us fairly impervious to detrimental [...]

Drum Miking Techniques

July 4th, 2012|

While working as a freelance engineer in a prominent Brighton studio I saw that here lay an excellent opportunity to properly exploit a decent live room and a large selection of microphones (a combination of [...]

Criticism

December 17th, 2011|

A word about criticism. Criticism is a necessary fact of life. It is required to regulate a democracy and ensure that the actions of empowered individuals and bodies are scrutinised against a consensus. Politicians, as [...]